Home » Traits of the Tea Party: Being a Memoir of George R.T. Hewes, One of the Last of Its Survivors : with a History of that Transaction, Reminiscences of ... and the Siege, & Other Stories .... by Benjamin Bussey Thatcher
Traits of the Tea Party: Being a Memoir of George R.T. Hewes, One of the Last of Its Survivors : with a History of that Transaction, Reminiscences of ... and the Siege, & Other Stories .... Benjamin Bussey Thatcher

Traits of the Tea Party: Being a Memoir of George R.T. Hewes, One of the Last of Its Survivors : with a History of that Transaction, Reminiscences of ... and the Siege, & Other Stories ....

Benjamin Bussey Thatcher

Published February 2nd 2015
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Kindle Edition
128 pages
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The subject of this biography, George Robert Twelves Hewes (1742 – 1840), was a participant in the political protests in Boston at the onset of the American Revolution, and one of the last survivors of the Boston Tea Party and the Boston Massacre.MoreThe subject of this biography, George Robert Twelves Hewes (1742 – 1840), was a participant in the political protests in Boston at the onset of the American Revolution, and one of the last survivors of the Boston Tea Party and the Boston Massacre. Later he fought in the American Revolutionary War as a militiaman and privateer. Shortly before his death at the age of 98, Hewes was the subject of two biographies and much public commemoration.From inside book:The subject of the following memoir, it will be found, was engaged, with all the activity characteristic of his constitution: of both mind and body, not only in the struggles of the seven years war, but in some of the most interesting of the events which preceded it immediately, and vividly illustrate its spirit, if they did not essentially co-operate (as some of them certainly did,) in bringing it on. To nave been, as he was, one of the members of the memorable Tea-party,—but especially a principal actor in the scene,—would seem to promise a value for his biography almost peculiar to itself, since very few survivors of that transaction, besides himself, remain. He was also present at the massacre of the 5th of March, and during the whole of it- and was intimately acquainted with most of the circumstances which led to it, and the influences which followed in its train. He was a resident of the besieged city during its hard times. He became personally involved in both the marine and military movements of the day. In a word, he happened to be one of that comparatively small class of persons who were situated, throughout the contests and throughout the context of affairs connected with it, in the midst of them, and, as it were, at the central seeing and hearing point. Boston, it cannot be denied, was, and was considered, abroad and at home, the head-quarters of the revolutionary spirit. Faneuil Hall has deserved its name of the Cradle of Liberty. The Otises, the Adamses, the Quincys, the Hancocks, were foremost men of all the world, in the maintenance and defence of republican principles. Here, always, were the severest resistance, and the greatest trouble and toil experienced by those who tried their experiments on our power of political endurance. The people of Boston, said a noble Lord, in the debate on the passage of the Port-Bill,— the people of Boston have been the ring-leaders of all the riots in America-* and there was meaning, if not truth, in the remark.Contents:CHAPTER I.Birth and parentage of the subject of this historyCHAPTER II.Anecdotes connected with the name of TwelvesCHAPTER III.The French WarCHAPTER IV.Synopsis of the leading incidents in the annals of the town for some years before the Revolution, of which Hewes was a witness.CHAPTER V.Immediate effect of the introduction of the troopsCHAPTER VI.The Massacre of the 5th of MarchCHAPTER VII.Ceremonies succeeding the MassacreCHAPTER VIII.Brief recapitulation of the history of the tea-politicsCHAPTER IX.Continuation of the Tea-History, through 1773, down to the arrival of the first cargo in BostonHarborCHAPTER X.Arrival of the tea-vesselsCHAPTER XI.Effects of the acts of the Tea-PartyCHAPTER XII.Hewes enters the naval serviceMEMOIR OF HEWES.This book published in 1835 has been reformatted for the Kindle and may contain an occasional defect from the original publication or from the reformatting.